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Snow Studded Tires or Studless Snow tires | TreadWright Tires

Winter is coming, and no we are not talking about the white walkers. We are talking about dropping temperatures, snowfall, and icy road conditions that make driving just as horrific as white walkers. Though we aren't Jon Snow, we can help reduce the stress by explaining your winter tire options. 

When it comes to winter people have a few options for their tires, purchasing Studless winter tires or Studable winter tires. To help you understand the pros and cons between both we break it all down below and other our personal recommendations. 

Studablle Tires 

Studded Snow tires were introduced to the United States in the 1960's to offer superior traction in heavy snow and icy conditions.  Studs consist of two primary parts the tungsten carbide pin and cylindrical metal jacket.  The Tungsten carbide pin is the element that protrudes beyond the tire tread and contacts the pavement surface. The cylindrical metal jacket is the outside part of the stud that is held in the tire tread rubber by a flange at the base.  Essentially, the studs will fit insides holes grooved inside the tread patterns. Studs can only be applied to new tread rubber because trying to stud an old used tread or re-studding a tire will only increase the risk of serious tire damage due to incorrect stud lengths. 

How to Install Studs

We recommend getting a professional mechanic to install your studs. The advice below is strictly for reference.  Once you purchase a tire that is studdable you will measure the depth of the hole to be studded with a tire tread depth gauge. If the measurement is 12/32", then the proper size tire stud is the TSMI #12. If the measurement is 13/32", then the proper size is the TSMI #13, etc.

Stud Sizes

Lubricate the holes with water to allow for easier installation.  Next, you will need to align the tip of the stud gun with the hole and press stud gun assembly firmly downward inserting the gun tip into the hole. To extract the stud gun you will need to decompress the trigger while maintaining downward pressure, release the trigger and let off the downward pressure. You will repeat the process on each stud while keeping the stud gun between 95 -110 psi. 

A properly installed stud should appear to be nearly flush with the tire surface. Only the carbide pin and about 1/32" of the stud body should be visible. Also, be sure that the stud is inserted straight into the hole. A leaning stud will not properly seat into the tire and will cause premature failure.

 

Pros and Cons of Studdable Snow Tires 

Pros:
  • According to Pemco Insurance, Studies show that studded tires perform best on clear ice in temperatures around the freezing mark. 
Cons:
  • Studs are known to tears up the highways & roads causing cracks that can increase hydroplaning conditions for other drivers 
  • Studs can be extremely loud with direct pavement contact
  • Studs are illegal in some states or have date restrictions 

Where are Studdable Tires Legal? 

Information provided by Drivinglaws.aaa.com

Alabama 

  • Studded tires are permitted at all times with rubber studs. Metal studs are permitted only during bad weather.

Alaska 

  • Studded tires are permitted, but with rubber studs and only in the following locations and times: September 16 to April 30 north of 60 degrees N; October 1 to April 14, south of 60 degrees N.

Arizona

  • Studded tires are permitted from October 1 to May 1.

Arkansas

  • Studded tires are permitted November 15 to April 15.

California

  • Studded tires are permitted November 1 to April 30 and if retracted, May 1 to October 31.

Colorado

  • Studded tires are permitted.

Connecticut

  • Studded tires are permitted November 15 to April 30.

Delaware

  • Studded tires are permitted October 15 to April 15.
  • District of Columbia 
  • Studded tires are permitted October 15 to March 15.

Florida

  • Studded tires are permitted but only with rubber studs.

Georiga

  • Studded tires are not permitted, except for snow and ice driving conditions.

Hawaii

  • Studded tires are not permitted.

Idaho

  • Studded tires are permitted October 1 to April 30. Fire departments and firefighting agencies are exempt. Other exemptions may be granted by the Idaho Transportation Board.

Illinois

  • Studded tire use is not permitted for most drivers. Rural mail carriers and persons with disabilities living in unincorporated areas may use them between November 15 and April 1.

Indiana

  • Studded tires are permitted October 1 to May 1, and if retracted, May 2 to September 30.

Iowa

  • Studded tires are permitted November 1 to April 1.

Kansas

  • Studded tires are permitted November 1 to April 15.

Kentucky

  • Studded tires are permitted.

Louisiana

  • Studded tires are permitted but only with rubber studs.

Maine

  • Studded tires are permitted October 2 to April 30, and if retracted, May 1 to October 1.

Maryland

  • Studded tires are not permitted, except in Allegany, Carroll, Frederick, Garrett, and Washington Counties from November 1 to March 31.

Massachusetts

  • Studded tires are permitted November 2 to April 30 unless otherwise authorized by Registrar.

Michigan

  • Studded tires are permitted but only with rubber studs.

Minnesota 

  • Studded tires are not permitted, except for nonresidents, who may use them for 30 days. Full-time non-resident students and nonresidents employed within Minnesota are not permitted use of studded tires regardless of vehicle registry. Rural mail carriers may use studded tires under certain conditions between November 1 and April 15.

Mississippi 

  • Studded tires are not permitted.

Missouri 

  • Studded tires are permitted November 2 to March 31.

Montana

  • Studded tires are permitted October 1 to May 31.

Nebraska

  • Studded tires are permitted November 1 to April 1.

Nevada

  • Studded tires are permitted October 1 to April 30.

New Hampshire 

  • Studded tires are permitted October 1 to April 30.

New Jersey 

  • Studded tires are permitted November 15 to April 1.

New Mexico 

  • Studded tires are permitted.

New York 

  • Studded tires are permitted October 16 to April 30.

North Carolina 

  • Studded Tires are permitted.

North Dakota 

  • Studded tires are permitted October 15 to April 15. School buses may use studded tires anytime during the year.

Ohio 

  • Studded tires are permitted, November 1 to April 15; April 16 to October 30 if retracted.

Oklahoma 

  • Studded tires are permitted November 1 to April 1.

Oregon 

  • Studded tires are permitted November 1 to March 31

Pennsylvania 

  • Studded tires are permitted November 1 to April 15.

Rhode Island 

  • Studded tires are permitted November 15 to April 1.

South Carolina 

  • Studded tires are permitted if they do not project more than 1/16 inch when compressed.

South Dakota 

  • Studded tires are permitted October 1 to April 30. Studded tires are permitted May 1 to September 30 if retracted. School buses and municipal fire vehicles permitted to use studs anytime.

Tennesse

  • Studded tires are permitted October 1 through April 15.

Texas

  • Studded tires are permitted, as long as the studs do not damage highway and are rubber.

Utah

  • Studded tires are permitted October 15 to March 31.

Vermont

  • Studded tires are permitted.

Virginia 

  • Studded tires are permitted October 15 to April 15.

Washington 

  • Studded tires are permitted November 1 to March 31.

West Virginia 

  • Studded tires are permitted November 1 to April 15.

Wisconsin

  • Studded tires are not permitted, except for authorized emergency vehicles, vehicles used to deliver mail, school buses from November 15 to April 1, and automobiles with out-of-state registration (only if in the course of passing through the state for a period of not more than 30 days).

Wyoming 

  • Studded tires are permitted. Chains are required in snow emergencies.

Puerto Rico 

  • Studded tires are not permitted.
BUY Studdable Tires

 Studless Winter Tires

These are winter tires that do not have the metal studs protruding from the tread.  Rather, the tires relay on the advancements in technology of tread patterns and rubber compounds for superior traction. Unlike Non-winter tires, TreadWright's Winter ready tires are able to sustain flexibility in freezing winter conditions allowing the tires to maintain traction in snowy or icy conditions. Non-winter tires become stiffer and less able to conform to the road in freezing winter conditions. 

 

The TreadWright Winter Solution 

If you experience extreme freezing conditions for an extended period than studdable tires are not a bad option.  However, if you don't want to mess with the hassle associated with studdable tires, but still have freezing winter conditions we recommend purchasing a studless TreadWright Tire with Kedge for an extra $10 a tire. 

Kedge Grip is a fine combination of walnut shells and glass particles that are mixed into the entire tread compound during the manufacturing process. Mixing Kedge Grip with the rubber compound allows Kedge Grip to be available for the entire life of a TreadWright tire. 


Kedge Grip creates micro siping on the surface of each tread lug when the mixture of particles flake off during use. This micro siping feature allows the tire to grip the road during extreme conditions of rain, snow and ice. Kedge Grip is the right choice for challenging all season and winter conditions.

    BUY Studless Tires with Kedge

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